Meydenbauer Center, Bellevue, Washington, January 2014

Dean Speer

Three of the artists being brought in by Chop Shop director Eva Stone discuss their backgrounds and works.

Adam Barruch  Photo © Steven Schreiber

Adam Barruch
Photo © Steven Schreiber

Adam Barruch

1. How did you initially get into the business of making dances?

I began my career as a child actor in musical theater, and when I later transitioned into to dance, I found that I had this great desire to create movement. I think it initially began as a way to explore and understand other choreographers that fascinated me. I can remember seeing the work of certain choreographers that I loved, and going into the studio to try and figure out the physical qualities that distinguished their work so clearly. Later, creating work became a journey to express myself through movement, and to find a way to physically embody my emotional life.

 2. Tell us something about the work you’re bringing to Chop Shop. For example, what inspired you and what should the audience expect and look forward to seeing?

"Belladonna" Photo © Nel Shelby

“Belladonna”
Photo © Nel Shelby

The work I am bringing to Chop Shop is two excerpts from an evening-length duet entitled “Belladonna”. It’s performed by myself and Chelsea Bonosky, a long-time collaborator. The work is loosely inspired by Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story “Rappaccini’s Daughter.” The actual story centers around a young woman made poisonous by tending to her father’s toxic botanicals and the man who falls in love with her. We’ve taken many thematic and archetypal elements of this story to explore the psychological worlds of these two characters. We will be showing two solos — that are in essence, monologues. They introduce the physical language and psychological themes of the piece. The music is two vocal selections by the countertenor Daniel Taylor.

 

3. Any concluding remarks?

Being at Chop Shop two years ago was such a joyous experience and we are looking forward to returning this year. Eva has such a passion for dance and we are so lucky to have her support!

 

Anna Conner Photo © Anna Conner

Anna Conner
Photo © Anna Conner

Anna Conner

1. How did you initially get into the business of making dances?

I grew up watching musicals. Some of my favorites were Singing in the Rain, Sound of Music, Young Frankenstein, Grease and anything with Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. My sisters and I used to put on shows for the family in our backyard with songs and all and those moments never left me. My work has definitely gotten darker and more intense since then. :-)

2. Tell us something about the work you’re bringing to Chop Shop. For example, what inspired you and what should the audience expect and look forward to seeing?

Human nature inspired this work. I’m really interested in how we treat each other in situations of hierarchy. I find it fascinating to witness groups of people switch leadership and demand power. In this work we really punish ourselves physically and mentally.

 

3. Any concluding remarks?

The work we are presenting at Chop Shop is an excerpt of our evening length work titled LUNA that we will be premiering at Velocity Dance Center March 21-23, 2014. More information about the show and our company can be found at: annaconnerandco.com

 

Saho Kumagai and Isaac Aoki Photo © Lindsay Thomas

Saho Kumagai and Isaac Aoki
Photo © Lindsay Thomas

Price Suddarth

1. How did you initially get into the business of making dances?

My first time choreographing was at the School of American Ballet’s student choreographic workshop in the fall of 2008.  I had been interested in “creating” since my first ballet class.  I’ve always enjoyed the process of building a ballet out of nothing.

 2. Tell us something about the work you’re bringing to Chop Shop. For example, what inspired you and what should the audience expect and look forward to seeing?

This ballet was created over the course of the last year…in which time my life was completely changing. On August 16, 2013 I was married to Emma Love (a fellow PNB dancer). I wanted my work to reflect the change happening in my own life. While my work is usually quick and more “exciting” I wanted to create something that was emotional and personal.

The piece “The Spaces Between” is essentially about life and how life is lived not in pictures or happy snap shots but in those spaces between that are sometimes hard and gritty but in the end life is beautiful in a way that only dance can express.

 

3. Any concluding remarks?
I am so excited to be a part of the festival and to have my work performed alongside such wonderful individuals and institutions.